catch2

Welcome back to a new post on thoughts-on-cpp.com. This time I would like to give an introduction into an automated build setup which, based upon Jenkins and CMake, fulfills the following needs:

  • Building a ready to deploy release on every commit
  • Execution of all tests
  • Running static code analysis to track code quality
  • And easy to extend with automated deployment (CD)

For all the necessary sources, I prepared a GitHub repository. We are focusing here only on a technical part of an automated build process which is a prerequisite of a CI/CD (Continues Integration/Continues Deployment) process. It is quite a bit more necessary than just tools for a company to fully embrace the ideas behind a CI/CD process but with an automated build and test setup your on a good way.

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Welcome back to the n-body-problem series. Last time we’ve been setting up our project structure and CMake setup. According to some helpful reddit comments, I adapted our CMake setup a bit, but I’m still not absolutely sure if the project structure, as it is now, will last to the end of the project. If you’ve missed any of the earlier posts, you can find them here:

  1. My God, it’s Full Of Stars: The n-body-problem series
  2. My God, it’s Full Of Stars: And then there was CMake

Because we want to exercise TDD, we somehow need to define some test cases first before we can implement our solver library. A simple scenario would be two points with an equivalent mass M , a distance of r and no initial velocity and acceleration. Clearly we could do hundreds of different complex tests with it. But i would like to start with two very simple and specific tests, point masses accelerating and moving only in x- and y-direction sole. This way we can check that, at least the basis, assumptions, formulas, and implementations are correct.

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